lioness regrowing her mane; unfiltered, untamed.

"ask away."   Gabi's mom. | free spirit. | in the throes of a serious quarter-life crisis. | somewhat educated. | dramatic and sarcastic. | only 4'11" = short-person complex. | serious love/hate relationship with people. | curly hair don't care. | leo. duh. | cray. AF. you been warned.

twitter.com/elle____dee:

    "

    i feel we’re close enough; could i lock in your love?
    i feel we’re close enough; could i lock in your love?

    now i’ve got you in my space, i won’t let go of you. got you shackled in my embrace; i’m latching on to you…

    ❤️✨

    "
    "Latch" x Disclosure/Sam Smith (whom i currently adore).
    — 3 days ago with 1 note

    blacknaturals:

    ♕  Teyonah Parris

    gorgeous.

    (Source: accras, via black-culture)

    — 1 week ago with 8223 notes
    jbaines19:

The best candy shop a child can be left alone in, is the library.— Maya Angelou 


yes, baby.

    jbaines19:

    The best candy shop a child can be left alone in, is the library.

    — Maya Angelou
     

    yes, baby.

    (via black-culture)

    — 1 week ago with 6830 notes

    our-memories-defeat-us:

    This show is so important. Here is one of the many reasons why [x]

    word.

    (Source: mydrunkvause, via luvvdivine)

    — 1 week ago with 2713 notes
    @uavac mascot Gabi is signed up for Make A Difference Day; no excuse for you not to join her!! help us #servetheplacethatservesyou and get to *500* registered volunteers by 6pm TODAY!! @uavac #UAMADD13

    @uavac mascot Gabi is signed up for Make A Difference Day; no excuse for you not to join her!! help us #servetheplacethatservesyou and get to *500* registered volunteers by 6pm TODAY!! @uavac #UAMADD13

    — 9 months ago
    #servetheplacethatservesyou  #uamadd13 
    auntada:

Leaders of the Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C., August 28, 1963
(from right to left) Mathew Ahmann, Executive Director of the National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice; (seated with glasses) Cleveland Robinson, Chairman of the Demonstration Committee; (beside Robinson is) A. Philip Randolph, organizer of the demonstration, veteran labor leader who helped to found the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, American Federation of Labor (AFL), and a former vice president of the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO); (standing behind the two chairs) Rabbi Joachim Prinz, President of the American Jewish Congress; (wearing a bow tie and standing beside Prinz is) Joseph Rauh, Jr., a Washington, DC attorney and civil rights, peace, and union activist; John Lewis, Chairman, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee; and Floyd McKissick, National Chairman of the Congress of Racial Equality.
Photo created by: U.S. Information Agency, Press and Publications Service

    auntada:

    Leaders of the Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C., August 28, 1963

    (from right to left) Mathew Ahmann, Executive Director of the National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice; (seated with glasses) Cleveland Robinson, Chairman of the Demonstration Committee; (beside Robinson is) A. Philip Randolph, organizer of the demonstration, veteran labor leader who helped to found the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, American Federation of Labor (AFL), and a former vice president of the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO); (standing behind the two chairs) Rabbi Joachim Prinz, President of the American Jewish Congress; (wearing a bow tie and standing beside Prinz is) Joseph Rauh, Jr., a Washington, DC attorney and civil rights, peace, and union activist; John Lewis, Chairman, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee; and Floyd McKissick, National Chairman of the Congress of Racial Equality.

    Photo created by: U.S. Information Agency, Press and Publications Service

    (Source: heytoyourmamanem, via newmodelminority)

    — 10 months ago with 230 notes

    newmodelminority:

    Sway reps the town Lovely.

    boop.

    — 10 months ago with 136207 notes

    strugglingtobeheard:

    note-a-bear:

    magnacarterholygrail:

    one day i’mma love someone and they’ll love me back like jay and beyonce love each other

    or like pharrell loves his dewy soft skin

    you ain’t right for that

    imma pray even tho i dont lol

    lmfaooooooo

    — 1 year ago with 77 notes
    The Thoughts That Made the Cut: My Little Brother Trayvon →

    cdotwdotw:

    I’m sorry.


    I’m… sorry.


    Those were the only words I could mumble at 9:12 PM, July 13, 2013. Initially angered, I swung my fists in the air. I cursed. I cried. I yelled. I’m human… But then… Then this unfamiliar feeling came over me. A feeling I have not felt in a long time. Disappointment….

    — 1 year ago with 7 notes

    miyabailey:

    @trinidadjamesgg @paperfrank @miyabailey #PinkLemonade #atlanta (at Blue Mark Studios)

    love it. i wish i lived in Atlanta sooooooo bad. :-/

    — 1 year ago with 4 notes
    Are you interested in sharing your story about being a woman of color in a predominantly white college/university? →

    navigatethestream:

    OTHERED IN ACADEMIA: A WOC ANTHOLOGY

    In academia, women of color are the token black sheep. Our presence provides high diversity points, but our hyper-visible bodies are identity-invisible inside yet another white/male only institution: academia. We all have a unique set of not-designer baggage that carries over from all the –isms of our raced, gendered, queered and classed lives that aren’t addressed properly by institutions that seek to serve white/male clientele. Academia is no different. Indeed, perhaps some schools hide their inequality better; but some schools make little to no effort to mask their disgust by WOC otherness. Though diminished safe spaces and colorblind policies create no end of discomfort for WOC at PWCs, the master narrative delegitimizes our concerns and works to silence our voices and stories.

    Without you coming forward and telling your story, academia would, once again, be overwhelmed with silenced voices of women of color, contributing to our continued erasure in this sphere. The perspectives that our intersectionality allows us are unique, and offer significant insight into our experiences. Since we are rarely allowed the opportunity to participate on equal footing with our white counterparts – regardless of our level of ability/brilliance/overall awesomeness – I believe that this is a good medium to start being comfortable with our own voices and telling our own stories. I am partial to the printed word, as I am a journalist by training and a poet by passion. I know that my experience at a predominantly white college (PWC) changed my ideas of identity, sense of self and the confidence with which I interact with others on a daily basis. This experience was not all sunshine and rainbows: a lot of it was rainbows, but a graver aspect included my feeling like a second class citizen, like the color of my skin afforded me a status of inferiority that I didn’t deserve in a world that privileged whiteness. I knew that standing alone, my story would not have as strong an impact; but if we pool our voices and come together to relate our experiences of race and identity, there is no telling what we could accomplish!

    In this project, I would like you to explicate through poetry, prose, creative non-fiction or photography (if fitting) your experience as a woman of color at a predominantly white college/university. Feel free to be as general or specific as you wish; be it about the administration, sports department, residential life, classroom etc.; as broad as something you’ve realized about race, class, gender and sexuality as a woman of color in a predominantly white school, an analysis of the system that continues to relegate you to inferior status, or that time your history was excluded from the dominant narrative in gender studies class; or based on themes like violence, immigration, LGBTQ and Trans* awareness. I encourage you to include all facets of your identity and make your analysis intersectional.

    No interpretation of this project is wrong. The only stipulation, in terms of content is that your piece must engage with race in some way. In regards to the form of your piece:

    • Up to 5 poems, no more than 1500 words;
    • Up to 3000 words of prose/essay/creative non-fiction. You may submit one long piece, or up to 3 shorter works. (Feel free to mix genres);
    • Submit each piece in a separate document;
    • Along with your work(s), submit a 50-80 word bio;
    Compensation is in the form of publication and copy of finished product.

    (via purvipatel)

    — 1 year ago with 364 notes
    A Proper Type Love

    cokelines:

    "He was the kind of man that builds libraries because once, over a plate of food neither of us really cared much for, you may tell him you love to read," she’ll tell them. They’ll look at her wondering why she stands in kitchens looking for a man she let go because she wasn’t sure how to love him back properly. And she never listened when he told her how to do so. 

    — 1 year ago with 2 notes

    n0purrpos:

    lenabeanss:

    sandyhair1968:

    aieshamyles:

    dopest-ethiopian:

    yarrahs-life:

    For you and those like you. You will never know how your life being taken ECHOED. NOT forgotten… Never.

    thegoddamazon:

    inbrekasmind:

    tornapartff:

    mijoswifey:

    blasianxbri:

    jamiethephoenix:

    blasianxbri:

    thetpr:

    withallthatpinkon:

    knowledgeequalsblackpower:

    RIP Trayvon Martin

    gives me chills

    He didn’t do a damn thing wrong

    I’m gonna reblog this every time I see it because never forget.

    What happened what is this? Someone educate me

    bruh… it’s footage from when Trayvon Martin went to 7/11 and bought Skittles & an Arizona prior to being murdered by George Zimmerman’s bitch ass.

    I was bout to pass it but something told me read the comments and watch..This gave me the chills.^”George Zimmerman’s bitch ass” you could not of said this any better.If you dont know who or what this footage is about.Go to the muthafuckin Google.com then go in the fuckin search box and type ‘Trayvon Martin’ and learn some shit!! Its definitely gon be part of history…For Each one,teach one

    R.I.P. Trayvon Martin

    Reblogging again

    Always reblog. For all the Black men and boys out there who can’t even be safe in their own neighborhoods.

    Makes me sit here and contemplate life as we know it.

    Chills foreal reblogging for tge umpteenth time…

    Justice for Trayvon Martin

    Rest in paradise Trayvon

    jeezus be justice for Trayvon.

    (via buckwheatsunderstudy)

    — 1 year ago with 198470 notes